Clay is weighed and wedged before throwing.

Each piece of pottery begins by centering the clay on the wheel.

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A guitar string, mounted to a brick, marks the height and width for a set of bowls.

After a pot has dried for a day or two, a foot ring is trimmed with a sharp loop tool.

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A group of Rose Bowls in a white stoneware ready for bisque firing.

The handle on a mug is one of the few processes that is not made on the wheel.

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Double foot rings on each plate.

Greenware pieces must be absolutely dry before bisque firing.

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Collared vases in white stoneware will be glazed in Eggshell.

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The surface of these match strikers with change dramatically after firing, from gray to almond-colored.

Using a piece leather to compress the rim of a bowl.

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This set of tumblers is drying and will be glazed in Matte Black.

The opening of this recycled clay bird feeder is made with a cookie cutter.

Glaze testing is a slow but rewarding part of the process. In the upper right is a sample that evolved into the Ice glaze.

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A balloon vase in recycled clay on the wheel.

The Flathead pattern is normally stamped, but here it is carved into a cylinder vase of recycled clay.

The word ‘studio’ sounds good, but it’s really a garage with ladders, extension cords, bikes, paint and garden tools.

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Glaze testing with two different clays — white and almond stoneware.

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The Flathead pattern is hand-stamped into a Trumpet Vase.

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This Fog Vase will be fired at Berkeley Potters Studio.

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A stamped number indicates the type of clay used.